Brexit offers opportunities for trade between UK and Port of Antwerp

Brexit offers opportunities for trade between UK and Port of Antwerp

The newly appointed British ambassador Martin Shearman visited the Port of Antwerp today. He got acquainted to the advantages offered by Europe's second-largest port, of course figuring Brexit high on the agenda. While the uncertainty over Brexit continues, one thing is clear: as soon as the UK leaves the European Union, in whichever form, there will be radical changes in the transport of goods between the two regions. Port of Antwerp foresees a modal shift from ferry to container transport by shortsea shipping.

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Modal shift to shortsea

Goods entering or leaving the EU by ferry ports will face more checks and red tape once Brexit comes along. Brexit means more inspections of people, goods and documents, resulting in higher costs, congestion and longer transit times for ferry transport.

Port of Antwerp anticipates that accompanied trucks will increasingly be replaced by shortsea container transport, which by definition refers to unaccompanied goods loaded on board by crane for non-oceanic crossings. Port of Antwerp is therefore gearing up for further expansion of shortsea links with the UK, thus offering at least part of the solution for the consequences of Brexit. Today's visit should therefore make it clear to ambassador Shearman that after Brexit, Antwerp will more than ever be the main gateway for trade between Europe and the UK.

‘Good friends and trading partners continue to talk to each other even in difficult and uncertain times', said CEO of Port of Antwerp - Jacques Vandermeiren during his meeting with the ambassador.

UK is major maritime trading partner

With nearly 17 million tonnes of freight the UK was the second-largest trading partner for Port of Antwerp in 2018. The main freight categories are chemicals, oil products and fast-moving consumer goods such as foodstuffs, toiletries and cosmetics. Existing and new shortsea services between Antwerp and the British Isles will undoubtedly gain in importance in the run-up to Brexit and after 31 October 2019, building on the present links with nine UK and Irish ports.

Port of Antwerp Brexit ready

Shortly after the British Brexit referendum in 2016, Port of Antwerp’s taskforce of ‘Brexperts’ has worked closely together with different stakeholders. Including Belgian Customs, the Belgian Food Safety Agency and major port community and business representatives to mitigate any negative consequences for the port.

"Brexit creates not only challenges but also opportunities for trade between the UK and Ireland on the one hand and the European continent on the other. Having more shortsea solutions in the logistics chain will not only mean greater reliability, it will also diminish our dependence on trucks for 'last mile' transport, as well as reducing costs and CO2 emissions," declared Justin Atkin, the Port of Antwerp representative in the UK and Ireland.

The Antwerp logistics service providers have a head start thanks to their experience with non-European shipping transport. This expertise ensures smooth handling of customs procedures and rapid transit times.

The customs authorities for their part are also getting ready: "We have already hired an additional 386 full-time employees in order to deal with Brexit. With 930,000 more import declarations and 4.5 million more export declarations the challenge facing us is enormous," explained Kristian Vanderwaeren, Director General of Belgian Customs & Excise.

No jam after Brexit

"Think Brexit will get your berries into a jam?" asks a new ‘white paper’ published by Port of Antwerp aimed at jolting companies into taking a hard look at their logistics chain. It contains lots of practical information on ways of using shortsea to reduce future uncertainties or delays or even avoid them altogether. Read the full paper here.

About Port of Antwerp-Bruges

With an overall throughput of 289 million tons per year, Port of Antwerp-Bruges is a critical hub in worldwide trade and industry. The port is a crucial link for the handling of containers, breakbulk and for the throughput of vehicles. Port of Antwerp-Bruges is home to 1,400 companies and accommodates the largest integrated chemical cluster in Europe. The port provides, directly and indirectly, a total of around 164,000 jobs and generates an added value of 21 billion euros.
 
The ambition for Port of Antwerp-Bruges is clear - to become the world's first port that reconciles economy, people and climate. As well as growing in a sustainable way, the Port also aims to focus on its unique position as a logistics, maritime and industrial centre and to take the lead in the transition to a circular and low-carbon economy. Together with the port community, customers and other partners, Port of Antwerp-Bruges is actively seeking innovative solutions for a sustainable future. High on the agenda is its responsibility for the environment and the surrounding society. 

The port sites of Antwerp and Zeebrugge are operated by the Antwerp-Bruges Port Authority, a limited liability company of public law with the City of Antwerp and the City of Bruges as its shareholders. The port employs 1,800 people. Vice-Mayor of Antwerp Annick De Ridder is President of the Board of Directors, the Mayor of Bruges Dirk De fauw is the Vice-President. Jacques Vandermeiren is CEO and President of the Executive Committee, which is responsible for the port’s day-to-day management. 

www.portofantwerpbruges.com

The telephone number +32 492 15 41 39 is only for press inquiries. For other questions you can mail to [email protected]

Port of Antwerp-Bruges
Havenhuis
Zaha Hadidplein 1
2030 Antwerp
Belgium